Designing Elvis Presley’s Graceland

Last week, you took our quiz to find out what room at Elvis Presley’s Graceland matches your personality. Are you as playful as the Pool Room? Do you want to geek out in the TV Room? Wanna go wild in the Jungle Room?

If you missed the quiz, no worries – you can take it here.

This week, we’re going to go a little more in-depth into the Graceland rooms featured in the personality quiz to learn more about their design.

Thousands of Elvis fans took the Which Room at Graceland Matches Your Personality? quiz, and more than 33% of responders most identify with the Living Room.

The 15-foot custom built sofa in Graceland’s living room was originally blue metallic and cost $1,375 in 1957. Elvis later had it recovered in white.

The 15-foot custom built sofa in Graceland’s living room was originally blue metallic and cost $1,375 in 1957. Elvis later had it recovered in white.

Trends came and went in the twenty years that Elvis lived at Graceland, and Elvis redecorated Graceland to match the times and his own personal taste. In the Living Room, the custom 15-foot sofa and 10-foot coffee table, matching end tables and a few other pieces offered a classic look, and they were in the Living Room from 1957 through the summer of 1974, when he redecorated (more on that in a minute). He often changed upholstery, carpet, paint, drapery and other accessories always evolved. The blue drapes that you now see on tour in Graceland are from the later 1960s-mid 1970s. During the Christmas season, the blue drapes were replaced with vibrant, festive red drapes – a tradition that remains true at Graceland every holiday season today.

In 1974, Elvis redecorated the Living Room with dramatic French Provencal furniture décor, including red carpet, red velvet furniture and red satin draperies. This look remained in place until the mansion opened for tours in 1982. The decision was made then to bring the older furnishings out of storage and return the Living Room – along with the Music and Dining Rooms – back to the way they were during most of the years Elvis lived at Graceland. Furniture and other details from the Living Room’s red redecoration are now on display in the Trophy Building.

The stained-glass peacock panels between the Living Room and Music Room, as well as the stained glass around the front door and the stained-glass fixtures over the pool table in the basement were added to Graceland in October 1974. The work was done for Elvis by Laukhuff Stained Glass Company of Memphis for the cost of $9,345.

The stained-glass peacock panels between the Living Room and Music Room, as well as the stained glass around the front door and the stained-glass fixtures over the pool table in the basement were added to Graceland in October 1974. The work was done for Elvis by Laukhuff Stained Glass Company of Memphis for the cost of $9,345.

The famous stained-glass peacocks in the living room were added in 1974. Elvis, a student of religion, added them as peacocks were an ancient Christian symbol of eternal life and resurrection.

Nearly 27% of people who took our What Room at Graceland Matches Your Personality? quiz got a wild result: the famous Jungle Room.

Elvis never called the Jungle Room by that name; to him, it was just the den. But thanks to its unique, exotic décor, the room became known as the Jungle Room after Graceland opened to the public.

The carved wooden furniture was purchased by Elvis at a furniture store in Memphis called Donald's.

The carved wooden furniture was purchased by Elvis at a furniture store in Memphis called Donald’s.

Elvis added the area as an extra family room during the 1960s. First it was a screened porch, then it became an actual room. He had the waterfall installed in 1965. While shopping for furniture in 1974, Elvis saw the collection of Polynesian-inspired furniture and fell in love. It reminded him of his favorite vacation destination – Hawaii – and it’s believed he purchased all of the furniture in a matter of 30 minutes. The carved wood details, the faux fur upholstery and the green shag carpet – on both the floor and the ceiling – give the room it’s completely one-of-a-kind atmosphere. Hawaii inspired the look of the room, but all of the furniture was purchased locally in Memphis.

That shag carpet came in handy when Elvis decided to turn the Jungle Room into a makeshift recording studio. The songs recorded there are featured on Elvis’ albums, “From Elvis Presley Boulevard, Memphis, Tennessee,” and a few more are featured on “Moody Blue.” Hear all of Elvis’ Jungle Room sessions on the 2016 compilation album “Way Down in the Jungle Room.”

Nearly 18% of those who took our personality quiz got The Kitchen.

When you tour Graceland, you see security camera monitors in the kitchen. Elvis and his staff used these monitors - as well as monitors in Elvis' bedroom suite - to keep an eye on the grounds.

When you tour Graceland, you see security camera monitors in the kitchen. Elvis and his staff used these monitors – as well as monitors in Elvis’ bedroom suite – to keep an eye on the grounds.

The comfortable, relaxing Graceland kitchen is perfectly 1970s – in fact, it remains exactly the way Elvis redecorated it in the mid-1970s. Elvis had the latest kitchen gadgets, too, including a very early model microwave. The three stained-glass overhead lighting fixtures were purchased in August 1974; he also purchased chandeliers for the front rooms during that same shopping trip.

The Kitchen was not originally included as part of the Graceland tour. Elvis’ aunt Delta, his father’s sister, still lived in the mansion when it opened to the public, and her room was just off the kitchen. Delta died in 1993, and the Kitchen was open to tours in 1995.

Fourteen percent of Elvis fans who took our quiz learned that the TV Room best matches their fun, pop culture-fanatic personality.

Artwork by Israeli printmaker, painter and sculptor Yigal Zemer can be found in the TV Room, too.

Artwork by Israeli printmaker, painter and sculptor Yigal Zemer can be found in the TV Room, too.

When you mention the TV Room, most Elvis fans know it as the room with three TVS – which is true. It’s also true that Elvis borrowed the idea from U.S. President Lyndon Johnson, who watched all three network news shows at once. Elvis kept up with the news and he enjoyed watching sports like football and boxing. A few shows he enjoyed are “I Love Lucy,” “The Andy Griffith Show,” “The Carol Burnett Show,” “Laugh-In” and other comedies.

The room is also famous for its bold yellow, navy and white color scheme with a lightning bolt – a nod to Elvis’ TCB logo. The room also features yellow shag carpet, a deep blue sectional, track lighting and chrome arc lamps. Like several other rooms at Graceland, the bar area in the TV Room is mirrored to make it seem bigger.

In addition to the television sets, the TV Room also features a stereo system and a built-in radio/home jukebox system that is wired to speakers all over the mansion. There is also a pull-down movie screen. Most of Elvis’ record collection is now in archival storage, but a few of his records are still in the TV Room.

The colorful Pool Room matched with 9% of our quiz takers.

The next time you tour Graceland, look for a tear in the felt on the pool table. The tear happened when one of Elvis' friends tried a trick shot that didn't quite work out.

The next time you tour Graceland, look for a tear in the felt on the pool table. The tear happened when one of Elvis’ friends tried a trick shot that didn’t quite work out.

Designer Bill Eubanks and Elvis worked together in 1974 to come up with the completely unique, vivid and intoxicating Pool Room (they also worked together on designing the TV Room). The look is turn-of-the-century European, with Asian, Indian and 1970s American influences. It took a crew of three about 10 days to cut, piece, pleat and hang the 350-400 yards of cotton fabric to the walls and ceiling.

The billiards table had been in that room since 1960, and when it came time to redecorate in ’74, Elvis wanted the table to stay in the room. The room also features three Louis XV style chairs, a nostalgic art print (including one of a Toulouse-Lautrec poster of a can-can girl), two sofas covered with the same fabric as the walls and ceiling and an accessorized baker’s rack. The twin billiard lamps above the table were custom-made by Laukhuff Stained Glass in Memphis, along with the peacock stained glass panels in the Living Room and the stained glass surrounding the front door of the mansion.

The fireplace in the Pool Room is the only wood-burning fireplace in the mansion (there are two other fireplaces in Graceland, and they are gas-burning). Once the fabric was installed, the family stopped using it, for fear that the fabric would catch on fire.

Explore these rooms for yourself when you visit Graceland! Start making your plans now at Graceland.com. Don’t forget to pick up an Official Graceland Guidebook, too – it includes gorgeous photos of the mansion, details about each room and much, much more.


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