Step Up Your Selfie Game at Elvis Presley’s Graceland

When you visit a location as iconic as Elvis Presley’s Graceland, you have to take time to take the perfect selfie. After all, what’s better than having your photo made in front of the king’s castle, or with his gorgeous Pink Cadillac, or with his Gold Records? We love seeing the creative photos and selfies that guests have snapped at Graceland – in fact, we’ve dedicated several past blog posts (here and here) to the best shots taken here. But back in March, we opened up our new exhibit and entertainment complex, Elvis Presley’s Memphis, which also opened up a new world for selfies. In this week’s blog, we’ll take a look at the best places to snap a selfie at Elvis Presley’s Memphis – and at Graceland, too, because there is no shortage of places to take a great photo at Elvis’ beloved mansion. As soon as you enter Elvis Presley’s Memphis, you’re greeted with our “Welcome to Graceland” sign. We love that this sign alone makes fans want to jump with joy!       Once inside Elvis Presley’s Memphis, there are a ton of great locations for a photo, especially in the new car museum, Presley Motors, or in Elvis: The Entertainer Career Museum, where you can find Elvis’ jumpsuits, awards, promotional photos, early albums and much more.           But of all of the wonderful places for a selfie at Elvis Presley’s Memphis, the most-photographed place is, hands down, a red, light-up ELVIS sign in Elvis: The Entertainer Career Museum. This sign brings out everyone’s inner rock star. Check out a few of these incredibly fun photos:           Elvis Presley’s Memphis is great, but you still have to take the perfect selfie at the king’s mansion across the street. Here are a few of our favorite recent selfies snapped at Graceland.             And finally, don’t forget to… We want to see YOUR photos next! Start planning your Graceland experience now – just go to Graceland.com to get your tickets, follow us on Instagram, and when you tag your perfect Graceland selfie, tag it with #Graceland – and you may see yourself on Graceland.com or on a future Graceland Blog post. Happy...
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Elvis Presley’s “Clambake” at 50

“You just said the magic word.” “’Clambake’?” “Yeah!” Elvis Presley’s colorful, swinging 60s romp “Clambake” was released 50 years ago this year. In the film, Elvis stars as Scott, the son of a millionaire who’s looking to make it on his own without his dad’s help. During a drive to Florida, Scott meets Tom (Will Hutchins), a waterskiing instructor, and the guys strike up a conversation. The guys decide to switch identities – Scott can find out if people will love him for who he is instead of his money, while Tom can live the high life as the son of a millionaire. It’s not long before Scott is tangled up in a love triangle between the beautiful Dianne (Shelley Fabares) and James J. Jamison III (Bill Bixby). Dianne has eyes for Jamison and his money, but Scott wants her for himself. As it often happens in Elvis movies, his character gets the girl in the end – after some songs, fights and, in this film, an exciting boat race. “Clambake” was Elvis’ 25th movie. Elvis began shooting “Clambake” in March 1967, although filming was delayed for about a month after Elvis fell and suffered a mild concussion. “Clambake” premiered in October 1967, but it wasn’t released nationally until November 22, 1967. The original title of the movie was “Too Big for Texas.”   While a lot of the movie was filmed in and around Miami, Elvis’ scenes were filmed in Los Angeles. A double was used for the scenes in Miami. Actual footage from the Orange Bowl International Power Boat Regatta was used for the film’s boat race. “Clambake” marks Shelley Fabares’ third and final Elvis film, having starred alongside Elvis in “Girl Happy” and “Spinout.” She also starred as Mary on “The Donna Reed Show.” Bill Bixby also starred in another Elvis film: “Speedway.” Bixby enjoyed roles on shows such as “My Favorite Martian” and “The Magician,” and he is best known for his role as Dr. David Banner on the CBS superhero show “The Incredible Hulk.” Another TV star appears in this movie: Flipper. Flipper the dolphin (whose real name was Susie), from the NBC show “Flipper,” has a cameo in “Clambake.” Tell us your favorite scenes and songs from “Clambake” in the comments! While some rock ‘n’ roll stars have made movies, no one did it quite like Elvis. Explore his movie career – as well as...
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Get an ‘A’ in Elvis – Trivia Game

Could you ace a class on the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll? Find out with our Elvis trivia game, and see if you can get an ‘A’ in Elvis. And don’t forget: to become an Elvis expert, you have to walk in his footsteps at Graceland. Make your plans to visit...
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The King’s New Clothes – Elvis Presley and Lansky Brothers

They say you should dress for the job you want, not the job you have. A young Elvis Presley did just that, with the help of Lansky Brothers Men’s Clothing Store. Elvis began shopping at this Memphis store when he was still in high school. He wanted to be an entertainer, and he followed many of the city’s local entertainers into Lansky Brothers. It wasn’t long before Elvis was dressing just like the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll he always knew he’d be. Lansky Brothers Men’s Clothing Store began in 1946, when Samuel Lewis Lansky, a Russian immigrant, purchased a store at 126 Beale Street for $125. He bought the store for his sons, Bernard and Guy. The store that had previously inhabited that location sold women’s clothes, so the Lanskys tossed the women’s wear and opted to sell what was readily available – army surplus clothing, thanks to the end of World War II. Once that trend died down, the men found their true calling – selling fashion for men. Bernard and Guy often traveled to California and New York to check out and buy the latest styles, which caused a stir back home in Memphis – no one had seen such bold colors and patterns. As Bernard said, the store sold clothes in vibrant “Life Savers” colors, like red, orange, yellow, green and purple. The Lansky Brothers display windows were always a sight to see, full of flashy, eye-catching designs. The store became a hit with local entertainers, church groups and bands. The guys focused on selling quality clothes at a fair price – in fact, the store claimed it was “just around the corner from high prices.” Bernard Lansky first noticed a young Elvis Presley checking out the store’s window displays in the spring of 1952. He invited Elvis to come in and shop, but the young king declined, saying he didn’t have any money. As the story goes, Elvis told him, “When I get rich, I’ll buy you out,” and Bernard replied, “Do me a favor: Don’t buy me out, just buy from me.” Elvis made good on that deal. Soon, he returned to the store to buy a shirt for $3.95. When prom season arrived, Elvis asked the tailors at Lansky’s to create a unique suit for him – one with a pink coat, black pants and a pink and black cummerbund. The pink...
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Elvis Presley’s #1 Hits – Part 3

One of the most breathtaking sights at Elvis Presley’s Graceland is the wall of Gold, Diamond and Platinum Records hanging in the Elvis: The Entertainer Career Museum. It’s an entire wall full of awards – and there are even more awards on the surrounding walls. This year on the Graceland Blog, we’re celebrating Elvis’ Number 1 hits. Check out part one and part two, and now, here’s part three. “Hound Dog” You ain’t nothin’ but a hound dog Cryin’ all the time Well, you ain’t never caught a rabbit you ain’t no friend of mine Originally, this song was performed by a woman, as she told off her “hound dog” of a man. This song, however, was written by two men – Mike Stoller and Jerry Leiber. They penned the tune for blues artist Willie Mae “Big Mama” Thornton, whose 1953 original landed at No. 1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart in the US. Rufus Thomas recorded “Bear Cat,” an “answer song” written by Sam Phillips, also in 1953. Freddie and the Bellhops recorded a male-perspective version of “Hound Dog” in 1955, and the group performed it in 1956 in Las Vegas. Elvis caught one of the group’s performances and loved their version; soon, he was also performing it live. Elvis recorded “Hound Dog” on July 2, 1956, at RCA Studios in New York, just one day after singing the tune to a Basset Hound on the Steve Allen Show. “Hound Dog” was recorded at the same session just prior to “Don’t Be Cruel,” so all of the same musicians were present, except Shorty Long, who was running late. Gordon Stoker filled in for him on piano. The Jordanaires provided background vocals and the clapping. (Learn more about “Don’t Be Cruel” from part 1 of this series.) It proved difficult to capture the excitement of Elvis’ live “Hound Dog” performances, and it took 31 takes for Elvis to be truly happy with the recording. “Hound Dog,” with “Don’t Be Cruel,” arrived in stores a few weeks after they were recorded. The two tracks were equally popular and fought for the top spot on the charts. “Hound Dog” has been covered numerous times by the likes of Jerry Lee Lewis, Jimi Hendrix (look out for artifacts from the legend in the new Icons exhibit at Graceland), James Taylor, Little Richard and many more. “Good Luck Charm” Come on and be...
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