Elvis Presley’s #1 Hits – Part 6

Elvis Presley earned the title of the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll thanks to his endless work inside the studio, on the stage and on the big screen. Elvis topped the charts again and again – if you need the proof, check out his wall of awards at Elvis: The Entertainer Career Museum at Elvis Presley’s Memphis at Graceland. Here on the Graceland Blog, we’re digging deep to go behind the scenes of Elvis’ biggest hits – in fact, we’re up to part 6. Check out part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4 and part 5. Which of these following Elvis hits is your favorite? “Too Much” Now you got me started Don’t you leave me broken-hearted ‘Cause I love you too much This jaunty hit was written by Lee Rosenberg and Bernard Weinman. It was recorded by other artists first, such as Bernard Hardison. Elvis recorded the track on September 2, 1956 at Radio Recorders in Hollywood, where he would often record his movie soundtracks. The Jordanaires provided background vocals, Scotty Moore was on guitar, Bill Black was on bass, D.J. Fontana played the drums and Gordon Stoker of the Jordanaires played the piano. The engineer was Thorne Nogar, who was very respected in the industry, and Elvis enjoyed working with him. “Too Much” was released as a single in January 1957 with “Playing for Keeps” on the other side. It hit No. 1 on Billboard’s pop singles chart, where it stayed for three weeks, with a total chart run of 17 weeks. It also reached No. 3 on Billboard’s R&B and country singles charts, and it ran on those charts for 10 weeks and 14 weeks, respectively. It peaked at No. 6 on the British pop singles chart. “(Now and Then There’s) A Fool Such as I” You taught me how to love And now you say that we are through I’m a fool, but I’ll love you dear Until the day I die Elvis added a healthy dose of the blues to this country song to create his own hit single. “(Now and Then There’s) A Fool Such as I” was written by Bill Trader and was recorded by Hank Snow in 1952. Elvis recorded it several years later, on June 10, 1958. He was on leave from the army and it was his only recording session during his two-year stint of active service. Elvis...
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